Poetry Challenge #83

Pets

Which animals make the best pets? List 5 or 10 or as many as you can in one minute. Which animals make the worst pets? List for another minute. What other animals can you think of? Time yourself one more minute.

Write a list poem using animals from your lists. Write three lines with 7 syllables on each line and finish the poem with a fourth line that has 5 syllables. If you need an extra syllable, you can add an adjective—a word that describes the animal—or a sound.

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #82

Diamond in the Rough

A Diamante is a diamond-shaped poem, simple as that.  In the same way diamonds/gems/rocks/stones—come in many shapes, colors, and sizes, diamante poems can be about anything, and they can be as long as you want to make them. A Diamante begins with a one word (or syllable) line. Each subsequent line grows longer by one. The longest line is at the midpoint.  From the midpoint, lines decrease in length until the poem ends as it began–with a one word line. The shortest Diamante has three lines:

One word
Two words
One word
 
Write a diamond-shaped Diamante about something you value. 
Here’s a frame to help you see your poem.
Here’s a Diamante Frame if you prefer structure.

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #81

Make a List

In a list poem, you can list things you like (animals, colors, makes of cars, playground games), signs of a season, tasks you have to do, items in a category, or what you’re going to do today. Once you have your list, play with the order. Choose better words that sound the same (maybe rhyme, or use alliteration). Can you make the poem sound like it has an ending?

Try writing a list poem. What are your plans for the day today? Or use one of the ideas above.

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.