Poetry Challenge #80

Scribble

In honor of National Scribble Day* celebrated every March 27th, scratch around for something colorful to write with: crayons, markers, colored pencils . . . lipstick—whatever you can find—and a piece of paper. Hold the writing implement in your non-dominant hand, close your eyes, take a deep breath and focus on whatever comes to mind. Then open your eyes and scribble—preferably on the paper.

Try scribbling whatever came to mind. if it was nothing, then scribble nothing. Scribble with 2-year-old abandon for as long as you can—at least 30 seconds.

Now, hold your scribble arm’s length away. While squinting like an artist (a beret might come in handy here), look beyond your scribble to what you drew. Write a poem about it.

*Not to be confused with National Crayon Day (March 31st).

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #79

Fibonacci!!

Number sequences are fun ways to create a form for a poem. You could write a poem with your phone number or your birthdate indicating the number of words or syllables on each line. You could write a poem based on the first six digits of pi.

A Fibonacci sequence begins with 0 and 1. Each number after that is the sum of the two previous numbers. The third number would be 0+1=1. The fourth number is 1+1=2. And so on.

Write a poem matching the number of syllables on each line with the first six numbers in the Fibonacci sequence: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8.

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #78

Little Bit of Bloomin’ Luck

“With a little bit of Bloomin’ Luck!” Alfred P. Doolittle sings in My Fair Lady. I know exactly how he feels! Who doesn’t wish for a little bit more luck—bloomin’ or otherwise. That’s what makes Saint Patrick’s Day one of my favorite holidays. Four leaf clovers, horseshoes, pots-of-gold, leprechauns, jigs, lucky charms and wearing green. It’s all about conjuring up luck and having fun while you’re at it. St. Patrick’s Day is this Sunday, March 17th, let’s celebrate by writing some lucky poems to celebrate.

If you had a bit of “bloomin’ luck” what would it be? What would you do with a lucky charm? Write a poem about it. Here’s a list of St. Patrick’s Day related words. See how many you can use in your poem:

Bagpipe, banshee, blarney, blarney stone, bog, brogue, celebrate, Celtic, clover, coins, donnybrook, emerald green, Emerald Isle, fortune, four-leaf clover, gold, good luck, green, harp, Ireland, Irish, jig, legend, leprechaun, limerick, , luck of the Irish, lucky, magic, March, mischief, pot of gold, potato, rainbow, Saint Patrick, shamrock, shillelagh, snake, St. Paddy’s Day, St. Patrick

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.