Poetry Challenge #96

National Hot Dog Day!

Concrete poems are words arranged in a shape to give extra meaning to the subject of the poem. Maybe the words form the branches of a tree or letters drip down the page to show rain. Sometimes there’s a surprise hidden in repeated words like the marshmallow in the concrete poem below.
                                                                          ***
                                  whipped
                                cream
                                    whipped
                    whipped cream whipped
                whipped cream whipped cream
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug      nd
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug  ha    le
            mug hot choco marshmallow late mug  ha      le
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug  ha      le
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug  ha      le
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug      nd
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug
            mug hot chocolate chocolate hot mug
            mug  mug  mug  mug  mug  mug  mug
                                                                                                 ***
Since today is National Hot Dog Day, let’s write a concrete poem about hot dogs or other vendor food. You could draw a hot dog with words or you could draw a hot dog and use words to dress up your hot dog. Do you like ketchup? Mustard? Onions? Sweet relish? Marshmallows?
Have fun!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1100 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #95

Cuckoo for Coconuts!!

Hooray! Hooray! It’s National Pina Colada Day!                                   pina colada.jpg

So, whether you do or do not like getting caught in the rain . . .

Whether you are or are not into health foods or champagne . . .

Regardless of your opinion about waking up at midnight—

Let’s put the lime in the coconut and bust out in poetry! Pul-lee-e-e-e-sa!* PLEEESE!

Thinking coconuts, tropical islands, pineapples ripe for the plucking, and cuckoo birds write a poem. And yes, because the notion that there even is a National Pina Colada Day is slightly cuckoo, use as many words as you can think of which include the letters C and O in that order. If you really want to cut loose, try including a bird call or two!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1100 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #94

Fireworks!!!

Freak the Mighty

In the book Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick, Max and Freak attend the Fourth of July celebration and Max is amazed at what Freak knows.

This is from page 32-33 in the book:

“Magnesium!” (Freak) shouts as the white sparkles glitter down over the pond. “Potassium chlorate!” as the shells go womp-womp-womp and everybody goes oooooh. “Potassium nitrate! Sulphur! Aluminum!” And after a burst of hot red fire in the sky, Freak tugs my hair and screams, “Copper! That’s copper powder combusting with oxygen!”

Try writing a poem that includes fireworks—either your description of them or their chemical names. Let your words burst on the page!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 1100 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge, let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.